Leinier Domínguez y el Mundial Caruana vs. Carlsen

Si amigos:

Lo que me había llegado a manera de comentarios “de pasillo” nos lo confirma ahora el abogado Enrique Ferreiro, Maestro Nacional Senior de Ajedrez Postal, Historiador de Ajedrez y quién atiende una de nuestras secciones especiales a través de su blog: Blog de Ferreiro

 

El Gran Maestro cubano Leinier Domínguez formó parte del equipo de acesores del GM norteamericano Fabiano Caruana en su entrenamiento previo al Torneo de Candidatos 2018.

Esto lo confirmó el propio Caruana en la entrevista que se le realizara al siguiente día de convertirse en retador del genio noruego GM Magnus Carlsen en el próximo Campeonato Mundial de Ajedrez: Entrevista al GM Faviano Caruana

Pero lea el artículo completo de Enrique Ferreiro en su web para mayores detalles: artículo de Enrique Ferreiro

Así que ya lo sabemos oficialmente, el próximo campeonato mundial tendrá un nuevo retador gracias a los aportes (entre otras tantas razones y personas) de un miembro ilustre de la escuela cubana de ajedrez.

Saludos,

Lenin Delgado

CD´21


Para los amigos amantes del idioma de Chakespiare les muestro a continuación la entrevista a Caruana en Inglés:

Caruana: ‘I Think My Chances Are About 50-50’

PeterDoggers

 30 mar. 2018 20:19 |

“If I come well prepared, and I assume he will come well prepared as well, then it’s going to be very close.”

Interviewed by Chess.com the day after winning the FIDE Candidates’ Tournament, Fabiano Caruana rated his chances in the world championship match against Magnus Carlsen as 50-50.

Chess.com sat down with Caruana the day after his victory at the Candidates’ Tournament in Berlin. We met on the third floor of the Scandic Hotel at Potsdamer Platz, where the players had stayed during the event. Casually dressed, wearing a hoodie with the logo of the Saint Louis Chess Club, he was in the middle of a full day of interviews. These are days which he might encounter more often, so hopefully he will get used to them.

What was your first thought when you woke up this morning, the day after the tournament was over?
“The first thing I did was check my tablet. I saw a stream of messages, emails, Facebook and Instagram, so I had to start replying to people [smiles]. But yeah, it still hasn’t quite hit me yet. It still feels so fresh. It was only yesterday that I still was completely unsure what would happen and now… it’s still so fresh in my mind.”

Let’s start before the tournament. Tell us a little bit about how you prepared for this?

“Basically I had a training camp in Miami. I invited several grandmasters: My coach Rustam Kasimdzhanov was there, Christian Chirila was there, Leinier Dominguez was there, and for a few days near the end Alejandro Ramirez joined. We basically worked on chess, openings… not just openings, all kinds of chess. We played training games and also a lot of physical stuff. We just enjoyed the weather, or into the house… it was very nice. That was basically all my prep for the tournament. It was close to 20 days; I was hoping for a bit more time than that but in the end, with playing Wijk aan Zee, there was only time for one training camp. But still, it put me in a great mood anyway, I still look back on the camp with fondness.”

Cuban GM Leinier Dominguez, who now lives in the U.S., was one of Caruana’s seconds. | Photo: Peter Doggers/Chess.com.

Since openings are so dominating these days, can you give an example of a non-opening activity you did?
The other guys worked on openings most of the time but while they were doing it, I solved a lot of studies. I also did some stuff which I really hate doing, which is, I went through some [Mark] Dvoretsky stuff, which I really don’t like doing, because it’s hard! Also, a lot of training games, a lot of blitz games. We even played some bughouse, which is not really chess training, but still, it’s fun. I would say most of the opening work I did was not opening work.”

“I also did some stuff which I really hate doing, which is, I went through some Dvoretsky stuff, which I really don’t like doing, because it’s hard!”

Anish Giri, who was a second here for Vladimir [Kramnik], wrote profiles on all participants for “New in Chess” and on yours he wrote that your weakness is actually opening preparation. Do you agree with his assessment, maybe looking at the last couple of years, and how do you think it went in this tournament?

“I wouldn’t say that it’s a weakness, but also think that it’s been greatly exaggerated that this is a strength of mine. People always say I’m well prepared, which I think is not completely untrue, but I don’t think it’s my main strength or anything. Anish probably has a point in that he always manages to outprepare me in the opening; sometimes he ends up four pawns up after the opening, and usually the game ends in a draw [laughs]. But I still don’t think it’s entirely true. I think it was also some way of his poking fun of me.”

You ended up playing five times 1.d4, two times 1.e4 and one time 1.c4, and also in Wijk aan Zee I think you played 1.d4 twice. Besides that, there hasn’t been much in recent years. OK, maybe you tested things out a bit of not playing 1.e4 during the Pro Chess League. How important was it for you to broaden your repertoire for the last couple of months?

“The thing is, at some point I was playing 1.d4 and the Catalan exclusively; there was a period in my career when I was mainly a 1.d4 player. Then I started to do serious work on 1.e4. It wasn’t a stylistic thing, I just started to do serious work mainly on 1.e4, and it became my main move. And then, once you put all this effort into this move, you start to feel less confident playing 1.d4 or 1.c4. But before this tournament I thought, instead of playing millions of Marshalls, Anti-Marshalls, Berlins, Anti-Berlins, I’ll just get something which is unexplored. So I prepared the Catalan, and especially this Qb3 idea, which is not much of anything for White [smiles]. But still, it gave me a game twice, against Sergey it didn’t give me anything but twice I got a game. Also, I won a game like that in the first round. It’s also nice to get a position which is fresh and where you know it well, and this was the main point.”

“Before this tournament I thought, instead of playing millions of Marshalls, Anti-Marshalls, Berlins, Anti-Berlins, I’ll just get something which is unexplored.”

How was the decision made that the Petroff would be your main weapon against 1.e4?

“I already for pretty much a year it’s been my main weapon. I can still play other openings; against Karjakin in London I played the Taimanov and occasionally I will play the French or the Caro-Kann or the Berlin but OK, the Petroff is my most well-prepared opening. Before this event we really spent a lot of time, trying to make sure that I understand it well and that I will know it better than my opponents. I did lose a game, but I also won two. So you know, the Petroff with all its drawish tendencies actually had three decisive games in my tournament!”

OK, so then the tournament starts. You start with a good win, and then a draw I believe. Maybe not only this huge game with Kramnik, but also the game before with Shakh was slightly shaky. Round three and four, was this a slightly more difficult phase in the tournament for you?

“Yeah, these three games, from round two to four, they were very tough. Against Ding Liren I was in serious trouble and it was also a very tough game where you have to calculate a lot. The game against Shakhriyar was enormously difficult. The entire game you’re calculating, the entire game you’re in time pressure, and at some point you’re fighting against three connected passed pawns. It’s a different sort of calculation, because you understand the price of one mistake is an immediate loss. You can’t make a single mistake in your calculations. And then, in the next game—I never had this—I had to fight against four connected passed pawns, two of which were on my seventh rank. I never had this before and it was also very stressful, especially in time trouble. So yeah, the length of the games, the amount of calculation I had to do and the amount of time trouble I faced made these three games very difficult.”

“It’s a different sort of calculation, because you understand the price of one mistake is an immediate loss. You can’t make a single mistake in your calculations.”

Do you think, in hindsight, that winning this game against Kramnik where you could easily have lost, was a crucial moment in the whole tournament?

“Yeah, of course. I mean, basically every game was crucial but especially this one because after that I started to pick up some steam, gain some confidence… A few rounds later I went to plus three and meanwhile Vladimir, who could have been on plus three after four rounds, start to also get tilted, I think it’s the only way to describe how he was playing after that game against Wesley, against Shakhriyar, all these games kind of showed that something wasn’t quite right with his psychological approach.”

Then you beat Levon, and you were the sole leader at half-time. Is this kind of a psychological thing, that you’re halfway through the tournament and you’re leading by that point, is that sort of giving you extra confidence?

“I think sometimes it’s the opposite because, once you start to have a lead for a few rounds, I think it happens with everyone, in matches also, you start to play a bit too defensively. You’re trying to hold on to your lead, which is not the right approach. You should just proceed as if things were as they were before. And that’s what happened to me, I was trying to hold on to my lead and it puts extra pressure on you. When you kind of feel that you’re already in command of the tournament, and you almost start to feel like the tournament is yours to win, then you start to play defensively, try to tighten up your play, and this led to a few awkward games, and ended up with my loss against Karjakin. I think my play in that game could be described as: I couldn’t take a decision.”

“When you kind of feel that you’re already in command of the tournament, and you almost start to feel like the tournament is yours to win, then you start to play defensively.”

But first, the one against Ding Liren. You had a huge chance to take a full-point lead in that round. Was that already tough to deal with and maybe it influenced your game with Karjakin?

“Yeah, it was a bit tough to deal with. I thought I was pressing the whole game but then at some point I thought he defended very well. All this …Ne7, everything was a beautiful defense, and I felt like we were close to a draw. And then he quickly and carelessly allows me to advance my passed pawn. And I realize I’m winning. But somehow this happened just all too fast. I went from thinking it’s gonna be a draw to thinking I’m completely winning…”

And it was time trouble.

“…and it was time trouble, and I also wasn’t sure. But then, I was winning after the time control. I was no longer in time trouble but still, I couldn’t adjust. I wasn’t sure if I was winning anymore, it started to look complicated. I missed one win, with Rd2, which was sort of subtle but still I should have found it, and then I got this completely accidental chance. But at that point I thought I had already screwed it up. I just wasn’t ready to look for a win. So I thought the game is over and I made one move without really thinking and I offered a draw. And in fact I had a win, literally with the most obvious move, which I saw, and the second move was also the most obvious move, and then I concluded my variation before even calculating what I can do on the next move. Just h7. I mean, how can you stop your calculation one move before. I think it’s only if you already think you’ve messed the game up.”

And then the game with Karjakin; you say it’s a game where you couldn’t make decisions?

“Yeah, I got this exchange up position, which is not bad, and I just have to do something. And then I gave him like 10 moves and his position was winning. And he played great, I mean, he converted without giving me a single chance. But I think there’s clearly something wrong when you have a position and you don’t do anything for 10 moves.”

That was obviously your worst game of the tournament. What do you think was your best game of the tournament? The one you’re maybe most proud of?

“Maybe in terms of quality my first game or my last game. Against Wesley, I think it was an excellent game. The last game against Grischuk, I think all things considered, was an excellent game. My first game against Levon, even though I did ruin a winning position at some point, I am still kind of proud to have navigated the complications in time trouble relatively well, not ideally, but still, I played them quite well. All my wins, even the game against Kramnik, not a good game but still, I did do something well in that game, it was a good fight.”

It was a lot of fun.
“Yeah, it was also a lot of fun.”

One of the impressive things about your win here is the way you bounced back after your loss. Two straight wins, and you nailed it. It’s a psychological strength I guess. Has this always been one of your strengths, to deal with losses, or is it something your worked on and you become well at these days?

“I’ve always been good at forgetting about losses relatively quickly. I don’t dwell over them too much. But sometimes I have tournaments where I lose a game and I just can’t recover. But I also remember when I started to come to the top of the chess world, around 2012, I would very often lose my first game. Like in Dortmund, I think I drew my first game from a bad position and I lost my second to Pono[mariov], and I won the tournament with plus three. And this happened more than once, I would start with a loss and then I would very quickly bounce back. That was the year when I was very good at bouncing back. Years after, usually if I start with a loss I’m not gonna win the tournament. But still, I do manage to forget about my losses relatively quickly, which is, I think, more a good thing than a bad thing.”

“I’ve always been good at forgetting about losses relatively quickly. I don’t dwell over them too much.”

You had a nice dinner after your win with a bunch of people, including your second Rustam Kasimdzhanov. How important has he been? What do you think has been his role in this victory?

“I think he played a huge part in it. I mean, we’ve been together for a few years, officially working together and going to tournaments since 2015 but before that we were also working. He’s a great guy, a great second, and we work well together. This is very important; you need someone who supports you and who you feel comfortable with and for me that’s him.”

As I understand, you didn’t have your phone available to you. It was broken during the tournament. Tell us about it. Did it help you to concentrate, stay away from social media, stuff like that? Was it actually good for your tournament?

“Right before the tournament at some point my phone just turned itself off, and then it turned itself on. It goes through the initial starting screen, and then it turns itself off again. And it keeps doing this. I don’t know what to do, and it’s doing this regardless, I can’t even turn it off, it’s just turning itself on again. I can’t get it started. So I looked online, I found that this is a bug which affects this phone and there’s been no official fix. There was, like, a do-it-yourself version which involved things that are just beyond my grasp. Technical things, downloading software, going through command prompts, troubleshooting my phone… things that I just can’t do. And so I thought: Why do I need my phone? I’ll just… Basically what I meant is that when I go out, I don’t have my phone. Which is great, because I don’t think having a phone with you all the time is a good thing. So yeah, it was probably a good thing in the end.”

With this tournament there were some issues with the organization. There was only one toilet on walking distance available, it was kind of noisy as I understand, but you seem to be someone who has been dealing well with it. You were concentrated, and I think you even said one day that you didn’t really notice the noise. Was this the case? Were you not too bothered by the things that were going on?

“For the most part I wasn’t bothered by noise. At the start of my game against Ding Liren I was very bothered because people were taking photos from above and there was a shutter sound. It was constant, it would go one for about 20 minutes and it was very difficult to not notice it. But for the most part I didn’t really notice the noise. Just occasionally there would be something that was very annoying. I do know that my opponents at times were also annoyed because of camera flashes, or sound, so yeah, it really wasn’t ideal. The toilet situation wasn’t ideal but it’s also not the worst thing ever. Overall, yeah, they could have done it a lot better. I don’t know why they didn’t think these things through, I mean, it really doesn’t take much effort to include another bathroom and make it a bit more soundproof and to avoid spectators having their phones on. I think a more serious concern is that his actually could allow cheating. I mean, all the players in the tournament have a lot of integrity but if they didn’t than this would actually allow them some way to cheat without any control. I think if they’re checking the players before the games with a metal detector they might as well check and ban phones for spectators so that there is no possibility that you can receive some help from somebody who is just looking at this phone and is seeing the moves. But overall it wasn’t that bad, but obviously it could have been improved a lot.”

“I don’t know why they didn’t think these things through, I mean, it really doesn’t take much effort to include another bathroom and make it a bit more soundproof and to avoid spectators having their phones on.”

It seems that many players of this tournament, and previous tournaments, don’t really like the tiebreaks and would prefer to see an immediate playoff in case of a tie for first place. Do you agree with this?

“Yeah, I think a playoff is fair. It’s the only, fully 100-percent fair solution. Most wins, most losses, these don’t favor one player of the other, they just favor someone who happens to be in the right place at the right time. And Buchholz is just pure chance. I mean, I beat Aronian twice so my tiebreak was pretty much ruined by that. I think direct encounter is a fairer tiebreak, but still, I think a playoff is perfect. I don’t think you’ll find any player who play the tournament who will say, ‘No, a playoff isn’t fair.’ This is obviously because it’s just a direct encounter and it’s clear the best man will win.”

It’s very far away, like half a year, but of course I do have to ask you: How do you see your chances against Magnus?

“I think it’s about 50-50. If I come well prepared, and I assume he will come well prepared as well, then it’s going to be very close. I’ll need to work very hard to get in form before the tournament because it’s clear that against Magnus it’s not really usually about openings. You just get a game somehow. With one color or the other, you get a game. So I’ll have to be able to play chess at the same level that he’s playing chess. I’m not going to crush him in the opening or anything. Of course I’ll try to be as well prepared as possible in the opening to get a comfortable position if I can with black and to put pressure on him with white. But it will really come down to if I can play at my highest level. If I can, then I think that my chances to beat him are fully within reach.”

“It will really come down to if I can play at my highest level. If I can, then I think that my chances to beat him are fully within reach.”

Tomorrow you’re already in a train to Karlsruhe. You’re going to play in the Grenke Chess Classic. How difficult is it to immediately play chess again, after this grueling tournament?

“I hope that I can just relax a bit. There’s no pressure on this tournament obviously, it’s just a training tournament and for fun. But it’s also very serious; I am playing Magnus, Maxime, Levon, they’re all playing there, Vishy is playing there. I mean, it’s a really tough tournament and so of course I wanna play well. But still, comparing to this event it feels very secondary.”

 


 

Ahora les expongo la entrevista traducida por Google, realmente no tengo tiempo para revisar la traducción, así que disculpen la traducción.———————————————————————————————————–

 

Caruana: ‘Creo que mis posibilidades rondan el 50-50’

PeterDoggers

 30 mar. 2018 20:19 |

“Si vengo bien preparado, y supongo que también estará bien preparado, entonces estará muy cerca.”

Entrevistado por Chess.com el día después de ganar el Torneo de Candidatos FIDE, Fabiano Caruana calificó sus posibilidades en el partido del campeonato mundial contra Magnus Carlsen como 50-50.

Chess.com se sentó con Caruana el día después de su victoria en el Torneo de Candidatos en Berlín. Nos encontramos en el tercer piso del Hotel Scandic en Potsdamer Platz, donde los jugadores se habían quedado durante el evento. Vestido casualmente, vestido con una sudadera con capucha con el logotipo del Saint Louis Chess Club, estaba en medio de un día completo de entrevistas. Estos son días que podría encontrar más a menudo, así que con suerte se acostumbrará a ellos.

¿Cuál fue tu primer pensamiento cuando despertaste esta mañana, el día después de que terminara el torneo?

“Lo primero que hice fue verificar mi tableta. Vi una serie de mensajes, correos electrónicos, Facebook e Instagram, así que tuve que comenzar a responder a las personas [sonrisas]. Pero sí, todavía no me ha golpeado todavía. Todavía se siente tan fresco. Fue ayer cuando todavía no estaba completamente seguro de lo que sucedería y ahora … todavía está tan fresco en mi mente.”

Comencemos antes del torneo. Cuéntanos un poco acerca de cómo te preparaste para esto?

“Básicamente tuve un campo de entrenamiento en Miami. Invité a varios grandes maestros: mi entrenador Rustam Kasimdzhanov estaba allí, Christian Chirila estaba allí, Leinier Domínguez estaba allí, y por unos días cerca del final se unió Alejandro Ramírez. Básicamente trabajamos en ajedrez, aperturas … no solo aperturas, todo tipo de ajedrez. Jugamos juegos de entrenamiento y también muchas cosas físicas. Simplemente disfrutamos del clima o de la casa … fue muy agradable. Esa fue básicamente toda mi preparación para el torneo. Fue cerca de 20 días; Esperaba un poco más de tiempo que eso, pero al final, al jugar Wijk aan Zee, solo había tiempo para un campo de entrenamiento. Pero aún así, me puso de buen humor de todos modos, todavía miro hacia atrás en el campamento con cariño.”

Dado que las aperturas son tan dominantes en estos días, ¿puedes dar un ejemplo de una actividad de no apertura que hiciste?

Los otros muchachos trabajaron en aperturas la mayor parte del tiempo, pero mientras lo hacían, resolví muchos estudios. También hice algunas cosas que realmente odio, es decir, pasé por algunas cosas de [Mark] Dvoretsky, que realmente no me gusta hacer, ¡porque es difícil! Además, muchos juegos de entrenamiento, muchos juegos relámpago. Incluso jugamos un bughouse, que no es realmente entrenamiento de ajedrez, pero aun así, es divertido. Diría que la mayoría del trabajo de apertura que hice no fue para abrir el trabajo.”

“También hice algunas cosas que realmente odio, es decir, pasé por algunas cosas de Dvoretsky,

que realmente no me gusta hacer, ¡porque es difícil!”

Anish Giri, que fue segundo aquí por Vladimir [Kramnik], escribió perfiles de todos los participantes para “Nuevo en el ajedrez” y en el suyo escribió que su debilidad es, en realidad, abrir la preparación. ¿Estás de acuerdo con su evaluación, tal vez mirando los últimos años, y cómo crees que fue en este torneo?

“No diría que es una debilidad, pero también creo que ha sido muy exagerado que esto sea una fortaleza mía. La gente siempre dice que estoy bien preparado, lo cual no es del todo falso, pero no creo que sea mi principal fortaleza ni nada por el estilo. Anish probablemente tiene un punto en que siempre se las arregla para superarme en la apertura; a veces termina con cuatro peones después de la apertura, y generalmente el juego termina en un empate [risas]. Pero todavía no creo que sea del todo cierto. Creo que también fue una forma de burlarse de mí.”

Terminaste jugando cinco veces 1.d4, dos veces 1.e4 y una vez 1.c4, y también en Wijk aan Zee creo que jugaste 1.d4 dos veces. Además de eso, no ha habido mucho en los últimos años. OK, tal vez pusiste a prueba un poco el no jugar 1.e4 durante la Pro Chess League. ¿Qué tan importante fue para ti ampliar tu repertorio durante los últimos meses?

“El caso es que, en algún momento, estaba jugando 1.d4 y el catalán exclusivamente; Hubo un período en mi carrera cuando era principalmente un jugador de 1.d4. Entonces comencé a hacer un trabajo serio en 1.e4. No fue algo estilístico, solo comencé a hacer un trabajo serio principalmente en 1.e4, y se convirtió en mi movimiento principal. Y luego, una vez que pone todo este esfuerzo en este movimiento, comienza a sentirse menos seguro jugando 1.d4 o 1.c4. Pero antes de este torneo pensé, en lugar de jugar millones de Marshalls, Anti-Marshalls, Berlins, Anti-Berlins, obtendré algo que no ha sido explorado. Así que preparé el catalán, y especialmente esta idea Qb3, que no es gran cosa para White [sonríe]. Pero aún así, me dio un juego dos veces, contra Sergey no me dio nada, pero dos veces obtuve un juego. Además, gané un juego como ese en la primera ronda. También es bueno tener una posición que sea fresca y donde la conozcas bien, y este fue el punto principal.”

“Antes de este torneo, pensé, en lugar de jugar millones de Marshalls,

Anti-Marshalls, Berlins, Anti-Berlins, obtendré algo inexplorado.”

¿Cómo se tomó la decisión de que Petroff sería tu arma principal contra 1.e4?

“Ya hace más de un año que es mi principal arma. Todavía puedo jugar otras aperturas; contra Karjakin en Londres jugué el Taimanov y de vez en cuando jugaré el francés o el Caro-Kann o el Berlín, pero está bien, el Petroff es mi apertura más preparada. Antes de este evento realmente pasamos mucho tiempo, tratando de asegurarnos de que lo entendía bien y de que lo sabría mejor que mis oponentes. Perdí un juego, pero también gané dos. Así que ya sabes, ¡el Petroff con todas sus tendencias de dibujar realmente tuvo tres juegos decisivos en mi torneo!”

OK, entonces comienza el torneo. Comienzas con una buena victoria, y luego un empate, creo. Tal vez no solo este gran juego con Kramnik, sino también el juego anterior con Shakh fue un poco inestable. En la tercera y cuarta ronda, ¿fue esta una fase un poco más difícil en el torneo para ti?

“Sí, estos tres juegos, de la segunda a la cuarta ronda, fueron muy difíciles. Contra Ding Liren estaba en serios problemas y también fue un juego muy duro en el que tienes que calcular mucho. El juego contra Shakhriyar fue enormemente difícil. Todo el juego que estás calculando, todo el juego te lleva a la presión del tiempo, y en algún punto estás luchando contra tres peones pasados ​​conectados. Es un tipo diferente de cálculo, porque usted entiende que el precio de un error es una pérdida inmediata. No puedes cometer un solo error en tus cálculos. Y luego, en el siguiente juego, nunca tuve esto, tuve que luchar contra cuatro peones pasados ​​conectados, dos de los cuales estaban en mi séptimo rango. Nunca tuve esto antes y también fue muy estresante, especialmente en problemas de tiempo. Así que sí, la duración de los juegos, la cantidad de cálculos que tuve que hacer y la cantidad de problemas de tiempo que enfrenté hicieron que estos tres juegos fueran muy difíciles.”

“Es un tipo diferente de cálculo, porque usted entiende que el precio de un error

es una pérdida inmediata. No puedes cometer un solo error en tus cálculos.”

¿Cree que, en retrospectiva, que ganar este juego contra Kramnik donde fácilmente podría haber perdido, fue un momento crucial en todo el torneo?

“Sí, por supuesto. Quiero decir, básicamente, cada juego era crucial, pero especialmente este porque después de eso comencé a ganar algo de tiempo, gané un poco de confianza … Unas cuantas rondas después fui a más tres y, mientras tanto, Vladimir, que podría haber estado en más tres después cuatro rondas, también empiezan a inclinarse, creo que es la única manera de describir cómo estuvo jugando después de ese juego contra Wesley, contra Shakhriyar, todos estos juegos mostraron que algo no estaba bien con su enfoque psicológico.”

Cuando venciste a Levon, eras el único líder en el descanso. ¿Es esto algo psicológico, que estás a mitad de camino del torneo y que estás liderando en ese punto, es ese tipo de darte confianza extra?

“Creo que a veces es todo lo contrario porque, una vez que comienzas a tener una ventaja durante algunas rondas, creo que sucede con todos, en los partidos también, comienzas a jugar un poco demasiado a la defensiva. Estás tratando de aferrarte a tu ventaja, que no es el enfoque correcto. Deberías proceder como si las cosas fueran como antes. Y eso es lo que me sucedió a mí, estaba tratando de mantener mi liderazgo y eso te ejerce presión adicional. Cuando sientes que ya estás al mando del torneo y casi empiezas a sentir que el torneo es tuyo para ganar, entonces comienzas a jugar a la defensiva, intentas reforzar tu juego, y esto te llevó a algunos juegos torpes, y terminaron con mi pérdida contra Karjakin. Creo que mi juego en ese juego podría describirse así: No pude tomar una decisión.”

“Cuando sientes que ya estás al mando del torneo y casi empiezas a sentir que

el torneo es tuyo para ganar, entonces empiezas a jugar a la defensiva.”

Pero primero, el que está en contra de Ding Liren. Tuviste una gran oportunidad de obtener una ventaja de punto completo en esa ronda. ¿Ya fue difícil de tratar y tal vez influyó en tu juego con Karjakin?

“Sí, fue un poco difícil de tratar. Pensé que estaba presionando todo el juego, pero luego, en algún momento, pensé que se defendía muy bien. Todo esto … Ne7, todo fue una defensa hermosa, y sentí que estábamos cerca de un empate. Y luego, rápida y descuidadamente, me permite avanzar mi peón pasado. Y me doy cuenta de que estoy ganando. Pero de alguna manera esto sucedió demasiado rápido. Pasé de pensar que va a ser un empate a pensar que estoy ganando por completo…”

Y fue un problema de tiempo.

“… y era un problema de tiempo, y tampoco estaba seguro. Pero luego, estaba ganando después del control de tiempo. Ya no tenía problemas de tiempo, pero aun así, no me podía adaptar. No estaba seguro de si ya estaba ganando, comenzó a parecer complicado. Perdí una victoria, con Rd2, que fue algo sutil, pero aún así debería haberlo encontrado, y luego tuve esta oportunidad completamente accidental. Pero en ese momento pensé que ya lo había estropeado. Simplemente no estaba listo para buscar una victoria. Así que pensé que el juego había terminado e hice un movimiento sin pensar realmente y ofrecí un sorteo. Y de hecho tuve una victoria, literalmente con el movimiento más obvio, que vi, y el segundo movimiento también fue el movimiento más obvio, y luego concluí mi variación incluso antes de calcular lo que puedo hacer en el próximo movimiento. Solo h7. Quiero decir, ¿cómo puedes detener tu cálculo con un movimiento anterior? Creo que es solo si ya piensas que has estropeado el juego.”

Y luego el juego con Karjakin; ¿Dices que es un juego donde no puedes tomar decisiones?

“Sí, obtuve esta posición de intercambio, lo cual no está mal, y solo tengo que hacer algo. Y luego le di 10 movimientos y su posición fue ganadora. Y jugó muy bien, quiero decir, se convirtió sin darme una sola oportunidad. Pero creo que claramente hay algo mal cuando tienes un puesto y no haces nada por 10 movimientos.”

Ese fue obviamente tu peor juego del torneo. ¿Cuál crees que fue tu mejor juego del torneo? De la que quizás estés más orgulloso?

“Tal vez en términos de calidad mi primer juego o mi último juego. Contra Wesley, creo que fue un excelente juego. El último juego contra Grischuk, creo que, considerando todo, fue un excelente juego. Mi primer juego contra Levon, aunque arruiné una posición ganadora en algún momento, todavía me siento orgulloso de haber manejado las complicaciones en problemas de tiempo relativamente bien, no de manera ideal, pero aún así, las jugué bastante bien. Todas mis victorias, incluso el juego contra Kramnik, no es un buen juego, pero aun así, hice algo bien en ese juego, fue una buena pelea.”

Fue muy divertido.

“Sí, también fue muy divertido.”

Una de las cosas impresionantes de su victoria aquí es la forma en que se recuperó después de su pérdida. Dos victorias consecutivas, y tú la clavaste. Es una fuerza psicológica, supongo. ¿Alguna vez ha sido uno de sus puntos fuertes, para lidiar con las pérdidas, o es algo en lo que trabajó y en el que se encuentra bien en estos días?

“Siempre he sido bueno olvidándome de las pérdidas con relativa rapidez. No me detengo demasiado en ellos. Pero a veces tengo torneos en los que pierdo un juego y simplemente no me puedo recuperar. Pero también recuerdo que cuando comencé a llegar a la cima del mundo del ajedrez, alrededor de 2012, muy a menudo perdía mi primer juego. Al igual que en Dortmund, creo que saqué mi primer juego de una mala posición y perdí mi segundo ante Pono [mariov], y gané el torneo con más tres. Y esto sucedió más de una vez, comenzaría con una pérdida y luego me recuperaría rápidamente. Ese fue el año en que fui muy bueno en rebotar. Años después, generalmente, si comienzo con una derrota, no voy a ganar el torneo. Pero aun así, me las arreglé para olvidarme de mis pérdidas con relativa rapidez, lo cual es, creo, más una cosa buena que una mala.”

“Siempre he sido bueno olvidándome de las pérdidas con relativa rapidez.

No me detengo demasiado en ellos.”

Tuviste una buena cena después de tu victoria con un grupo de personas, incluyendo tu segundo Rustam Kasimdzhanov. ¿Qué tan importante ha sido? ¿Cuál crees que ha sido su papel en esta victoria?

“Creo que jugó un papel importante en eso. Quiero decir, hemos estado juntos durante algunos años, oficialmente trabajando juntos y yendo a torneos desde 2015, pero antes de eso también estábamos trabajando. Es un gran tipo, un gran segundo, y trabajamos bien juntos. Esto es muy importante; necesitas a alguien que te apoye y con quien te sientas cómodo y para mí ese es él.”

Según entiendo, no tienes tu teléfono disponible para ti. Se rompió durante el torneo. Cuéntanos sobre eso. ¿Te ayudó a concentrarte, mantenerte alejado de las redes sociales, cosas así? ¿Fue realmente bueno para tu torneo?

“Justo antes del torneo, en algún momento mi teléfono se apagó solo y luego se encendió. Pasa por la pantalla de inicio inicial y luego se apaga de nuevo. Y sigue haciendo esto. No sé qué hacer, y está haciendo esto independientemente, ni siquiera puedo apagarlo, solo se enciende de nuevo. No puedo comenzar. Así que miré en línea, encontré que este es un error que afecta a este teléfono y no ha habido una solución oficial. Había, como, una versión de hágalo usted mismo que involucraba cosas que están más allá de mi alcance. Cosas técnicas, descarga de software, pasando por instrucciones de comando, solución de problemas de mi teléfono … cosas que simplemente no puedo hacer. Y entonces pensé: ¿Por qué necesito mi teléfono? Yo solo … Básicamente lo que quise decir es que cuando salgo, no tengo mi teléfono. Lo cual es genial, porque no creo que tener un teléfono contigo todo el tiempo sea algo bueno. Así que sí, probablemente fue algo bueno al final.”

Con este torneo hubo algunos problemas con la organización. Solo había un retrete a una distancia accesible para caminar, era algo ruidoso, como yo lo entiendo, pero pareces ser alguien que ha estado lidiando bien con él. Estabas concentrado, y creo que incluso dijiste un día que realmente no notaste el ruido. ¿Fue este el caso? ¿No te molestaban demasiado las cosas que estaban sucediendo?

“En su mayor parte no me molestó el ruido. Al comienzo de mi juego contra Ding Liren, estaba muy molesto porque la gente tomaba fotos desde arriba y había un sonido de obturador. Era constante, sería uno durante unos 20 minutos y era muy difícil no notarlo. Pero en su mayor parte, realmente no noté el ruido. Solo ocasionalmente habría algo que era muy molesto. Sé que mis oponentes a veces también estaban molestos por los flashes de la cámara o el sonido, así que sí, realmente no era lo ideal. La situación del inodoro no era ideal, pero tampoco es lo peor. En general, sí, podrían haberlo hecho mucho mejor. No sé por qué no pensaron estas cosas, quiero decir, realmente no requiere demasiado esfuerzo incluir otro baño y hacerlo un poco más insonorizado y evitar que los espectadores tengan sus teléfonos prendidos. Creo que una preocupación más seria es que en realidad podría permitir hacer trampa. Quiero decir, todos los jugadores en el torneo tienen mucha integridad, pero si no lo hicieran, esto les permitiría hacer trampa sin ningún control. Creo que si están revisando a los jugadores antes de los juegos con un detector de metales, podrían verificar y prohibir los teléfonos para los espectadores, de modo que no hay posibilidad de que puedas recibir ayuda de alguien que solo está mirando este teléfono y está viendo los movimientos. Pero en general no fue tan malo, pero obviamente se pudo haber mejorado mucho.”

“No sé por qué no pensaron estas cosas, quiero decir, realmente no requiere demasiado esfuerzo incluir otro baño

y hacerlo un poco más insonorizado y evitar que los espectadores tengan sus teléfonos prendidos.”

Parece que a muchos jugadores de este torneo, y torneos previos, realmente no les gustan los desempates y preferirían ver un desempate inmediato en caso de un empate en el primer lugar. ¿Estás de acuerdo con esto?

“Sí, creo que un desempate es justo. Es la única solución de 100 por ciento justa. La mayoría de las victorias, la mayoría de las derrotas, no favorecen a un jugador del otro, solo favorecen a alguien que está en el lugar correcto en el momento correcto. Y Buchholz es pura casualidad. Quiero decir, le gané a Aronian dos veces, así que mi desempate fue bastante arruinado por eso. Creo que el encuentro directo es un desempate más justo, pero aún así, creo que un desempate es perfecto. No creo que encuentres ningún jugador que juegue en el torneo que diga: ‘No, un desempate no es justo’. Esto es obviamente porque es solo un encuentro directo y está claro que ganará el mejor hombre.”

Está muy lejos, como medio año, pero por supuesto tengo que preguntarte: ¿cómo ves tus posibilidades contra Magnus?

“Creo que es alrededor de 50-50. Si vengo bien preparado, y supongo que también estará bien preparado, será muy cercano. Tendré que trabajar muy duro para ponerme en forma antes del torneo porque está claro que contra Magnus no suele ser sobre aperturas. Usted acaba de obtener un juego de alguna manera. Con un color u otro, obtienes un juego. Así que tendré que poder jugar al ajedrez al mismo nivel en el que juega al ajedrez. No voy a aplastarlo en la apertura ni nada. Por supuesto, trataré de estar lo más preparado posible en la apertura para obtener una posición cómoda si puedo con negro y presionarlo con blanco. Pero realmente se reducirá a si puedo jugar en mi nivel más alto. Si puedo, entonces creo que mis posibilidades de vencerlo están completamente al alcance.”

“Realmente se reducirá a si puedo jugar en mi nivel más alto.

Si puedo, entonces creo que mis posibilidades de vencerlo están completamente al alcance.”

Mañana ya estás en un tren a Karlsruhe. Vas a jugar en Grenke Chess Classic. ¿Qué tan difícil es volver a jugar ajedrez de inmediato, después de este torneo agotador?

“Espero poder relajarme un poco. No hay presión en este torneo, obviamente, es solo un torneo de entrenamiento y por diversión. Pero también es muy serio; Estoy jugando a Magnus, Maxime, Levon, todos están jugando allí, Vishy está jugando allí. Quiero decir, es un torneo realmente difícil y, por supuesto, quiero jugar bien. Pero aún así, en comparación con este evento, se siente muy secundario.”

1 comentario

  1. Carlsen y Caruana tienen un programa de competencias muy cargado hasta su match de noviembre en Londres y coincidirán en Noruega en el Altibox Norway de mayo y junio. Ver:

    http://ferreiro01.cubava.cu/2018/04/15/itinerario-de-carlsen-y-caruana-previo-al-match-de-londres-2018/

    Un cordial saludo desde http://ferreiro01.cubava.cu/

    Ferreiro

Deja un comentario

Your email address will not be published.